Shalom Life | July 29, 2015

New Israeli Device Helps Detect Respiratory Problems in Premature Infants

Israeli researchers from the Technion and Carmel Medical Center develop unique device to provide early-stage treatment and prevent complications in premature babies.

By: NoCamels Team

Published: March 27th, 2012 in Health » Israel

New Israeli Device Helps Detect Respiratory Problems in Premature Infants

Israeli researchers from the Technion and Carmel Medical Center have developed a unique device to monitor respiratory problems in premature infants.

The device immediately detects the development of respiratory deterioration and helps to characterize it, before the onset of distress that may lead to serious and irreversible injury to the premature babies. Thus, it provides early-stage treatment and prevents complications.

The researchers, Dr. Dan Waisman from the Technion‘s Rappaport Faculty of Medicine and Carmel Medical Center and Prof. Amir Landesberg of the Technion’s Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, say that the device, called the Pneumonitor, continuously and systematically monitors the dynamics of premature babies’ breathing.

The device was tested successfully on mice, rats and rabbits in different disease models. “We simulated common conditions that occur in premature babies in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, as well as an animal model for asthma and compared the operation of our device to that of competing devices,” they explain. “We also tried the device in 63 cases in Carmel, Bnai Zion and Rambam Medical Centers.”

Avoiding fatal complications

According to the researchers, it has been reported that 45 percent of life-threatening situations that occur in a Neonatal Pediatric Intensive Care Unit go undetected by monitoring devices currently used and are detected only by staff visual inspection of their patients. Even when the devices do detect a problem, the patient is often already in distress and can develop serious complications. It then still remains for the doctor to identify the cause of the problem.

The Pneumonitor has three miniature motion sensors that are attached to the infant on both sides of the chest and the upper abdomen. When respiratory deterioration is detected, the device signals an alarm before the onset of distress, and provides information that can assist in the diagnosis of the nature and location of the problem. The motion sensors quantify the breathing effort and the symmetry of lung ventilation. The device displays data on the respiratory conditions and indicates changes in the level of ventilation.

The Technion reports that approximately 10 percent of all births worldwide are preterm and an additional 10 percent of full-term babies suffer complications and require tight respiratory supervision. Moreover, 15 percent of premature babies born under 1,500 grams do not survive and an additional 15 percent suffer from serious complications such as mental handicaps, hearing and visual problems and chronic lung disease.

A significant number of these complications are related to respiratory management and care, the researchers say, making early identification of respiratory distress in premature babies crucial.

The results of the research were recently published in the Journal of Intensive Care Medicine. The Technion has registered a patent for the device and has set up a company called Pneumedicare, located in Yokne’am, Israel, and managed by Dr. Carmit Levy, who received her Ph.D. from the Technion’s Department of Biomedical Engineering. The device is now ready for FDA review.

This article is reprinted with permission from NoCamels.

Israeli Startup Using Bugs to Tackle World Hunger Israeli Startup Using Bugs to Tackle World Hunger TrendingIsraeli Researchers Say Light Beams, Not Pacemakers, Are the Future of Heart Treatments Israeli Researchers Say Light Beams, Not Pacemakers, Are the Future of Heart Treatments TrendingBroke a Bone? Smoke a Joint Broke a Bone? Smoke a Joint Trending
 

Israeli Startups Set New All-Time Record, Raise $1.12 Billion In Last Three Months

July 28, 2015 | By Einat Paz-Frankel, NoCamels
Israeli Startups Set New All-Time Record, Raise $1.12 Billion In Last Three Months

179 Israeli startup and high-tech companies exceed former record set in 2014

Read More

Teva to Buy Out Allergan in $40 Billion Deal

July 28, 2015 | By Maria Cruz
Teva to Buy Out Allergan in $40 Billion Deal

The pharmaceutical giant just made a deal with the Dublin-based company

Read More

Indian President Pranab Mukherjee to make Historic Visit to Israel

July 28, 2015 | By JNS.org
Indian President Pranab Mukherjee to make Historic Visit to Israel

Many are hailing the visit as a further illustration of the growing ties between the two countries

Read More

Obama Responds to Huckabee’s Holocaust Comparison

July 28, 2015 | By Maria Cruz
Obama Responds to Huckabee’s Holocaust Comparison

The "ridiculous" comments have now been addressed by the president himself

Read More

Over 10,000 Israelis Arrive to See Chris Brown

July 28, 2015 | By Amit Cotler
Over 10,000 Israelis Arrive to See Chris Brown

Brown puts on energetic show in Rishon LeZion

Read More

WATCH: Every Time Jon Stewart Has Done, or Said, Something Jewish

July 28, 2015 | By Maria Cruz
WATCH: Every Time Jon Stewart Has Done, or Said, Something Jewish

With the help of Senator Schumer, Stewart remembers his heritage in a hilarious way

Read More

This Israeli City Is Not Having Any of Nicki Minaj’s Butt

July 28, 2015 | By Maria Cruz
This Israeli City Is Not Having Any of Nicki Minaj’s Butt

Nahariya has just released a list of songs they're permanently banning, including Jason Derulo, Robin Thicke, and others

Read More

Between 800 to 900 People are Homeless in Israel

July 28, 2015 | By Daina Goldfinger
Between 800 to 900 People are Homeless in Israel

Members of Knesset discuss solutions that could be implemented to help the homeless

Read More

More Headlines